Sleep Apnea

  • The Serious Complications of Severe Sleep Apnea

    Severe sleep apnea is a serious form of sleep apnea characterized by very frequent periods of not breathing during sleep. If you or someone you know has been diagnosed with sleep apnea, or you snore during sleep, you might be at risk for severe sleep apnea.

    In this blog post, we will define severe sleep apnea, list the potential complications, and explore options to help you manage it before it gets worse.

    Continue reading

  • Understanding Sleep Apnea: A General Overview

    Sleep apnea is a severe sleep disorder that, if left untreated, can lead to severe health problems. The word apnea means a cessation of breathing, so sleep apnea means that one stops breathing during sleep. Although your body will force a deep breath eventually, people with sleep apnea can go 10 seconds or more without breathing per episode, and these episodes can happen up to 100 times an hour.

    In this article, we will discuss an overview of sleep apnea including symptoms, complications, and treatment strategies. However, consider these stats regarding sleep apnea:

    Continue reading

  • Health Tips for Sleep Apnea

    If you have obstructive sleep apnea, also known as OSA, you might be wondering if there are any health tips [1] that can help you feel better during the day. There are many things you can do to lessen the ill effects of sleep apnea, and they involve taking care of your overall health. We'll go over the basic health tips for sleep apnea patients, and how they will help.

    Continue reading

  • How Sleep Apnea Can Affect Everyday Life

    If you have sleep apnea, you might not even be aware of it. You also may not realize how bad it can be. If someone isn't there while you're sleeping to hear you snore loudly or gasp for air in your sleep, it can go completely undetected. Another sign is how sleep apnea can affect everyday life.

    Sleep apnea can have serious consequences[1] if the moderate to severe cases are left untreated. Because you've stopped breathing for short periods of time throughout the night, you're losing oxygen, which is vital to all the cells in your body. It can lead to heart disease because your heart has to compensate and work harder for the shortage of oxygen in your bloodstream.

    Of course, sleep apnea becomes especially apparent when it starts to affect how you feel during the day. Here are some common ways that sleep apnea can affect everyday life:

    Continue reading

  • Technology and Treatments for Sleep Apnea

    More than 11 million people in the US [1] are reported to have been diagnosed with Sleep Apnea. These numbers are according to the most recent report from the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute. There are likely many more who have it but have not yet been diagnosed.

    You might be one of the many who think they may have sleep apnea. Here are a few red flags that might make you want to see your doctor, to possibly get checked out:

    Continue reading

  • Use of a CPAP Machine for Sleep Apnea and a Better Night's Sleep

    Sleep apnea can be an underlying issue because you might not be aware that you have it. Sometimes it takes someone being in the room with you while you are sleeping to tell you that you might have sleep apnea. If not, you should be paying attention to how you feel in the morning and throughout the day for signs that you need to be checked for this potentially dangerous problem.

    Continue reading

  • How to Cope with Sleep Apnea

    Do you wake up feeling tired with a headache in the morning? Do you have problems concentrating or forget frequently? Or do you snore while sleeping? These are all common symptoms with patients who suffer from sleep apnea.

    Sleep apnea is a very common problem in society today. OSA affects approximately 12 million people in the US alone. Sleep apnea is a sleep disorder that is characterized by abnormal pauses in a patients sleep pattern. The pause is classified as an apnea event and is measured by how many seconds or minutes a patient stops breathing in an hour. When a patient stops breathing, it means that your brain or the rest of your body may not be getting enough oxygen. If a patient has sleep apnea it can lead to high blood pressure, stroke, heart attacks, diabetes, and depression. Sleep apnea if untreated can worsen a patient’s current medical condition. Sleep apnea is easily diagnosed and can be treated.
    Continue reading

  • CPAP/BiPAP as a Treatment for Sleep Apnea

    Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) is a condition in which while the patient is sleeping their airway becomes narrowed and airflow pauses or decreases, this can be confirmed by a sleep study. CPAP or Continuous Positive Airway Pressure is the most common form of therapy for the treatment of OSA. CPAP machines increase the pressure in the airway in order to maintain a clear airway while the patient sleeps. BiPAP or bi-level positive airway pressure is a similar therapy that has two pressure levels involved so that the patient can breath out against the lower pressure.

    For patients in need of sleep therapy there are many CPAP and BiPAP products available. Some machines have a set high and low pressure range prescribed by the doctor for patient comfort and automatically adjust the pressure within that range according to the patient’s needs while they are asleep. Other machines have one set pressure that must be set determined by their physician. Some machines have special comfort features such as humidification or oxygen therapy. At AMSR we also carry portable BiPAP machines so our patients can sleep easy regardless of where they are.
    Continue reading

  • Health Problems or Sleep Problems?

    If you've ever had a baby, or taken care of a baby for any length of time, you know that when they start crying, you don't always know what's wrong. Sometimes you try everything you can think of and still they cry. It's frustrating to be unable to diagnose the problem, and even more frustrating when you think you know what's wrong but it just doesn't calm them down.

    The same sort of problem can occur no matter how old a person gets. Sure, most people stop the incessant crying, and as they learn to speak they can make specific complaints, but often the diagnosis still ends up wrong, and the problem continues. A common misdiagnosis involves sleep problems, especially sleep apnea.

    Sleep apnea is a sleep disorder involving pauses in breathing or periods of very shallow breathing. It is diagnosed with an overnight sleep study. If no sleep study is done, however, a person can live with sleep apnea for some time and experience a wide range of effects that they don't know how to explain. These can be confused with depression, dementia, or many other mental or physical ailments. Sleep apnea can sometimes go on for years before being identified, impacting health in other ways, as well as social and occupational status.

    Continue reading

  • Ask a Respiratory Therapist? - What is Obstructive Sleep Apnea?

    Ask a Respiratory Therapist?

    By Lori Peters, RRT, AMSR Respiratory Therapist

     Question:  What is Obstructive Sleep Apnea?

    Answer: Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) is a common disorder that involves pauses, or periods of apnea, while someone sleeps.  These pauses between breaths might last from 10 seconds to a few minutes. The severity of apnea is measured in terms of the number of times the apnea occurs over the course of an hour; this can be anywhere from 5 to 30 times or more. The apneic period ends when the patient takes his or her next breath, oftentimes with a loud snorting sound. Sleep apnea results in low nighttime blood oxygen levels and daytime sleepiness, due to the restless sleep from the night before.

    Continue reading

10 Item(s)