Oxygen Cannula

  • The Important Relationship Between an Oxygen Flow Meter and Breathing Pattern

    Before you buy an oxygen flow meter, there is something to learn about in advance: your breathing pattern can affect the final oxygen dose you receive from your flow meter.

    Many patients receiving oxygen therapy aren’t fully aware that various breathing patterns have direct effects on how they set their oxygen flow meter.

    Your physician prescribes oxygen at a specific dose, one that is appropriate for your condition. However, even though your doctor has prescribed a set liter flow for you (usually 1–3 liters per minute), many variables affect that liter flow. And some can lead to dramatic shifts in the amount of oxygen you are receiving.

    How does this happen? The main problem affecting your therapeutic oxygen level is air dilution.

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  • How to Use a Cannula with a Oxygen Concentrator

    If you need oxygen therapy currently, or if you ever needed oxygen at any point in your life, it was most likely delivered through a nasal cannula. A nasal cannula is the name for the rubber prongs and the attached tubing that is inserted into the nostrils, which runs along the side of the face and around the back of the head. They are also often referred to simply as nasal prongs.

    How to use a nasal cannula with your oxygen therapy equipment might seem pretty self-explanatory, but there are few things you should know about this important oxygen therapy accessory.

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  • Customer Question: How Often Should I Change my Oxygen Cannula?

    "Hello, I just received my first portable oxygen concentrator the other day, and I'm very satisfied with the service. I'm glad that it also came with a free nasal cannula and tubing, which saved me some hassle even though it doesn't seem like a big deal. I was wondering how often I should change the nasal cannula, or how I know when to change it. Thanks in advance!" - Bobbi J.

    Thank you for this question, Bobbi, we're very glad that you are satisfied with your new concentrator and our service. The question of changing your cannula is very important and the answer depends on a few different factors.

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  • Making Your Nasal Cannula and Rubber Tubing Last Longer

    A nasal cannula, the two soft rubber prongs that fit into your nose, and the rubber tubing they attach to, are two very simple but essential accessories you need for oxygen therapy. A standard cannula comes with each of our oxygen concentrators and is pretty cheap when you need to replace it, no more than $6.00 for a regular rubber tube with nasal prongs. These are cheap, but why not make sure it lasts as long as it can?

    It's also a good idea to order one longer before you know you will need to replace the one that you're using now. It's just quicker and more convenient to be able to switch it out, without having to order it and wait for it to come in the mail.

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  • Looking for Oxygen Cannula Testers

    At American Medical we are always looking for ways to improve our products so we love to get feedback from our customers. We are looking for 5 people to test and give us feedback on three different cannula’s that we offer.

    We value your input and are interested in your general cannula feedback but particularly your thoughts on differences of each cannula and any suggestions you have on cannulas from Soft Hose, Captive Technologies and Salter Labs.

    As a participant of this testing, we will send cannulas at no cost to you. If you are interested, please contact [email protected].

  • Nasal Cannula and Face Mask Comfort Tips and Hints

    Our oxygen concentrators come with their nasal cannula and rubber tubing, but these are only suitable for patients who are in a stable condition. In the case of a COPD exacerbation or an acute flare-up of any kind, you will need to get a face mask, or a special face mask called a non-rebreather mask if a much higher dose of oxygen needs to be delivered.

    Using any one of these types can become uncomfortable, but there are some things you can do to make them a little less uncomfortable.

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  • Nasal Cannula Care

    Simply wipe down the part (prongs) that inserts into your nose, as well as the seven-foot length of tube that connects to it, with an alcohol swab once a day.

    If you’re on oxygen 24 hours a day, seven days a week, it might be easier for you to have two cannulas at all times—one to use while the other is being wiped down and allowed to dry.

    Alternate the cannulas for two weeks only, then discard them and use new ones.

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  • Caring for Your Nasal Cannulas: How to Clean and When to Replace

    by Lori Peters, RRT, AMSR Respiratory Therapist

    People on oxygen therapy are typically more susceptible to respiratory viruses and bacteria.  With the winter months fast-approaching, ensuring that your nasal cannula is germ-free is even more important AND good common sense!

    Simply wipe down the part (prongs) that inserts into your nose, as well as the seven-foot length of tube that connects to it, with an alcohol swab once a day. If you’re on oxygen 24 hours a day, seven days a week, it might be easier for you to have two cannulas at all times—one to use while the other is being wiped down and allowed to dry.

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