3 Easy Exercises with a POC

A portable oxygen concentrator is an incredible device that has given thousands of patients renewed freedom and independence. Removing the tether to old, clunky, and outdated oxygen solutions opens the door to endless possibilities and experiences.

Another wonderful benefit to owning a light-weight and portable oxygen solution is your ability to exercise. Staying active and exercising may seem challenging when you suffer from COPD or other lung related illnesses. However, regular physical activity can actually help to strengthen your respiratory muscles, improve circulation and oxygen usage, and even assist in decreasing some COPD related symptoms.

Below you can find 3 of our favorite and less intensive exercises that are easier to complete with a portable oxygen machine. Please check with your doctor before making any changes to your health related habits.

1. Walking


Walking may seem simple, but it’s top on our list due to the fact that it is relatively low-impact and low resistance. Another great thing about walking is that it is completely free to do. Take a walk around your house, yard, neighborhood, local mall, and more. You don’t need any special equipment aside from your concentrator and your own two feet! Scientists have found that patients who maintained moderate or high level(s) of exercise— which in most cases equated to a walking regimen — were hospitalized only 53 percent as often as those who didn’t walk regularly(1).

Walking

If you suffer from allergies or other environmental related irritants it’s always important to check the AQI or Air Quality Index (Click Here to Read More about AQI) and the weather before your walk. Always be sure to check with your doctor prior to starting any new exercising and health related habits.

2. Arm Curls


Believe it or not, there are exercises you can complete while remaining seated and they will still be an effective way to improve your overall health! One great example of this style of exercise is the classic arm curl. Simply hold the weights are your sides, palms forward, and lift toward your chest, keeping elbows down, and exhaling slowly. (See the example below)

Arm Curls

Lifting weights helps you to build strength, muscle mass, and muscle efficiency. Building muscle mass helps teach your body to use oxygen more efficiently and thus can help improve your COPD related symptoms. Don’t worry, you don’t have to do any serious lifting, even a moderate weight used regularly can help to strengthen your muscles overtime.

Always be sure to check with your doctor prior to starting any new habits.

3. Exercise Bike


Exercise bikes have been around for years and may seem like an outdated piece of equipment, however, they’re a great choice for someone with back, knee, joint, or COPD related issues. Exercise bikes help to strengthen your leg muscles, and works to improve your overall health and endurance. There are many different styles of exercise bikes available, many of our patients prefer a Recumbent bike. A Recumbent bike is a stationary bike that is reclined, with the peddles directly beneath you, allowing you to stretch out your legs. This style is generally less intensive and a favorite for those with knee related issues.

As always, check with your doctor prior to starting any new exercise habits.

Exercise Bike

Remember: Always speak with your doctor before beginning any new health related habits. If you have questions regarding your ability to preform these exercises, please speak with your doctor directly.

(1) https://www.webmd.com/lung/copd/news/20140305/2-mile-daily-walk-might-help-fight-copd#1

13 thoughts on “3 Easy Exercises with a POC”

  • Linda Cohen

    Wonderful advice and greatly appreciated!

    Reply
  • Linda Cohen

    Wonderfully helpful advice. Thanks!

    Reply
  • Ana Emilia Hasler
    Ana Emilia Hasler November 16, 2017 at 2:28 am

    You offer the free guide but do not accept my phone number. I live in Brazil, so my phone is not like the US it is 55 (Brazil) 71 (Salvador) 3263-0782, Can I still receive the guide?

    Reply
    • Danielle Jason

      Thank you for your comment, Ana. If you are having difficulties reaching us, you are more than welcome to reach out to us via email at [email protected] Let me know what guide you are looking to download and I can have a specialist email it to you.

      Reply
  • Julia Ines Escobar
    Julia Ines Escobar November 16, 2017 at 3:10 am

    Thank you for the exercise tips. I would prefer to walk.

    Reply
    • Danielle Jason

      You are most welcome, Julia. If you're interested in learning about any other topics, feel free to send us any questions or suggestions to [email protected] and we may write a future blog post on it!

      Reply
      • david wallace

        does it make a difference walking in colder weather?32- 50 degrees. ????

        Reply
        • Danielle Jason

          That's a great question, and one your doctor will have to answer for you. Many COPD patients have sensitivities to variances in weather such as temperature, humidity, and etc. We suggest speaking with your doctor, as they will have the personal information required (such as your individual condition, health requirements, allergies, tolerances, and so on) to make any form of assessment.

          Reply
  • barbara cox

    can you advise me on a carrier for my portable oxygen - I carry them on my shoulder and they do get heavy -the portable carriers that they have only seem to go to 4 or5 - I am on 5 litterss and they also are large - I do go to exercise and try to do some yoga -maybe you can give me some advise - thank you

    Reply
    • Danielle Jason

      Thank you for your question, Barbara. What unit are you using currently? Are you able to pull a rolling cart behind you? Many of our units that feature a higher flow rate have a cart or wheels that allow it to roll easily along side or behind you. I've passed along your information to one of our Oxygen Specialists who will reach out to you regarding your inquiry.

      Reply
  • THOMAS W GRAVES

    What criteria can I use to establish what levels of I need IE. 2lpm 3lpm 5lpm etc I would be pleased if you could give me some tips at what level I should try to maintain even when walking about.

    Reply
    • Danielle Jason

      Thank you for your comment, Thomas. That is a question you will need to inquire with your physician about. Your Doctor will work with you to find the right settings for your medical and lifestyle needs.

      Reply

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