How Portable Oxygen Concentrators Work

80 percent nitrogen and 20 percent oxygen

The air around you--in your house, outside, or wherever you are--contains about 80 percent nitrogen and 20 percent oxygen.

If you need oxygen therapy, it's because your respiratory system can no longer get enough oxygen just by breathing in air. So you use an oxygen concentrator, which delivers purer oxygen to your lungs.

How Oxygen Concentrators work:

Your oxygen concentrator takes in air and filters the oxygen from the nitrogen. It then releases the nitrogen back into the air. The concentrator briefly collects the oxygen and then dispenses it back to the patient.

How Oxygen Concentrators Work

As long as you have it running and set properly, your oxygen concentrator is continually "making" 90 - 95 percent pure oxygen out of normal air, so you'll have all you need.

Safe and simple

Oxygen concentrators have become more popular and widely used than old-fashioned oxygen tanks. Why use oxygen in tanks when you can "make" all the oxygen you need, simply and efficiently? Plus, the older-style compressed oxygen tanks can leak and cause explosions and fires. While these events are uncommon, they do happen. Oxygen concentrators, on the other hand, pose no such danger.

Oxygen on the go

The other main benefit of oxygen concentrators is mobility. Most of the concentrators AMSR sells are portable, which means they're designed to be used at home or on the go. With a portable concentrator, you'll always have all the oxygen you need, no matter where you are.

Pulse-dose vs. Continuous flow technology

You might have heard about something called pulse-dose oxygen. It's essentially a newer oxygen therapy technology that delivers oxygen through your cannula only when you breathe in. Continuous flow oxygen, by contrast, is constantly flowing through the tubes.

We recommend talking to your doctor about which dosing technology is right for you. Pulse-dose technology can be delivered in a smaller overall package size and will allow for longer battery life. Alternatively, most patients who require oxygen for sleep use a continuous flow dosage due to shallow night breathing. Sometimes it's appropriate to use continuous flow oxygen while you sleep and pulse-dose oxygen during the daytime.

Advantages of Oxygen Concentrators

Both portable and home oxygen concentrators have numerous advantages for those patients needing oxygen therapy. Oxygen concentrators are much less dangerous than traditional oxygen cylinders, which can, if ruptured or leaking, cause or increase the combustion rate of a fire. Oxygen concentrators, on the other hand, pose no such danger. Home and portable oxygen concentrators that can "make" their own oxygen have become more popular and widely used than old-fashioned oxygen tanks. The other main benefit of oxygen concentrators is the ease and increased ability to be mobile with oxygen. Portable oxygen concentrators provide the necessary oxygen anywhere the patient goes, even on airplanes. The FAA (Federal Aviation Administration) has ruled that all passengers who require oxygen must be allowed to bring FAA-approved portable oxygen concentrators on all U.S. aircraft with more than 19 seats. Foreign airlines must also allow portable oxygen concentrators on all flights to and from U.S soil. As of May 2011, more than 10 different models of portable oxygen concentrators have been approved for in-flight use.

Please contact us if you have any questions on How Oxygen Concentrators Work.