Tips for Going Camping with your Oxygen Concentrator

Like with any other chronic condition or special medical need, you should be able to go anywhere you want and do the things you would have been doing, whether you are using oxygen therapy or not. Camping is something many families do together during the summer, and you should be able to go along without worrying that your need for oxygen therapy would be any sort of burden. The only burden would be bringing along oxygen equipment that is inconvenient or not functioning properly.

Bringing along a portable oxygen concentrator is your best bet, since you don't have to worry about running out of oxygen. You should never have to run out of oxygen in the great outdoors! If your family is planning a week or longer excursion out in the woods this summer, we have a few tips and suggestions for you to make it as fun and hassle-free as it can be.

Consider Renting a Portable Concentrator

If you don't want to commit to buying a portable concentrator, or if you know you won't need one after your camping trip, renting one is your best bet. Choose the portable model that will fit your oxygen needs, and one with a great, long lasting battery.

We have the Sequal Eclipse 3, the Respirionics SimplyGo, DeVilbiss iGo and Oxlife Independence available to rent, if you need a continuous flow of oxygen. These models also have pulse dose settings. Our other rental portable models have pulse dose only, and if you only need pulse dose oxygen, the Inogen G2 would be a great selection because of their great battery life.

If you need constant, pulse dose oxygen, the Inogen models are recommended, so you won't need to charge your concentrator battery as often. The G2 with the 24-cell gets as much as 8 hours of battery life. If you don't need constant pulse dose, the Lifechoice would be ideal because of how small and easy-to-carry it is.

Plan Ahead With Extra Battery Power

Even though you may be getting a camp site with an electrical source (a must), you will need to be able to explore and go hiking through the woods with your family, or do the other things they have planned. This is where having an extra battery will come in handy, especially if you are using your oxygen concentrator all day, or for most of the day.

An extra battery with an external battery charger would be ideal. Just plug in the charger, and the battery into the charger while you are off adventuring and using the one in your concentrator. When you get back to the site and your battery is almost drained, switch them out and put the fully-charged one into your concentrator. One battery and a back-up battery should be enough for you, even if you will be gone for a week. How many back-ups you have on you depends on how far from your camp site you will be hiking.

Another important thing to bring with you, is a pulse oximeter. When you are hiking or exerting yourself in some way, you will need to make sure you are still getting enough oxygen. If your blood oxygen level drops, you may need to rest or turn up the flow rate as prescribed by your doctor.

2 thoughts on “Tips for Going Camping with your Oxygen Concentrator”

  • Ken Stevenson
    Ken Stevenson May 9, 2017 at 5:26 am

    Training for a new way of life. ugh. Last Summer I spent 4 months - three mornings per week - at Pulmonary Rehab. Learning that I have been breathing wrong for most of my life (don 't laugh - so do you. *snicker*). This past February I whined to my pulmonologist about running out of breath when doing normal household chores. Now all those things I learned in pulmonology therapy are more than just excises - they're literally life and death. Anyway so, I am an avid camper and hiker. I have a Lbarador Retriever who MUST get exercise every day...not to mention that my doctor says the very worst thng a person can do when he/she has Emphysema is to stop moving. So now, for the past 6 weeks I have been attempting to relearn life. That is, life with oxygen. And when I go hiking with my dog, I definitely do take my pulse oximeter. I 'modified' my backpack so that I can hump with two water blisters (each is 1.75 liter) and two of the M6 (2 liter) oxygen cylinders - actually three because I carry one in the shoulder case intended for that purpose. I also take along my pedometer/activity tracker. All in all though - it really isn't any different than when I used to hump 123 miles through the woods looking for a camp spot. I suppose now I'll either just use campgrounds, or camp at spots I know, that are close to my parking location. *shrug* So some things have to be changed in my life. Anyway - I haven't yet had the opportunity to go camping. Primarily I am just "training" myself to hike with emphysema. I haveb't received my POC yet - it's on order. So as sooon as I have the POC (yep, with two spare batteries) I'l be scoping out the tent sites. :)

    Reply
    • Danielle Jason
      Danielle Jason May 10, 2017 at 1:26 am

      Wonderful, Ken! Thank you for sharing. Should you need any further oxygen related equipment for your hiking trips, feel free to give us a call at 877-774-9271.

      Reply
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